WillBits

Support for change

“Wills and estate law (testamentary practice) is open to the vagaries of replication and loss of documents, wills that are created in uncertain circumstances or under duress, and is an area that unfortunately can involve older members of society who are subject to physical or mental elder abuse or neglect, at a time when individual wealth in Australia is at an all time high. In short, older Australians are being taken advantage of. The Law Council of Australia has done a great deal of work in the area of elder abuse which is a recognised and increasing phenomenon in Australia. Willbits business model addresses those issues and creates, through use of block chain technology, a greater degree of certainty and traceability of testamentary documents. It also elegantly fulfils a demand by lawyers practising in the area for storage and accurate retention of testamentary documents and thus addresses not only individual business needs but broader public policy concerns.”

Morry Bailes

past president,Law Council of Australia

past president,Law Society of South Australia

former Managing Partner,Tindall Gask Bentley

“I write this letter at the request of WillBits and with much enthusiasm for their initiative. With an increasingly geographically mobile population and technologically connected society, the modes in which we facilitate the practice of succession law have severely failed to maintain pace with our modern community nevermore so highlighted than recently with social distancing measures preventing legal practitioners from undertaking due diligence when assisting clients in this area of law. While the process of obtaining Probate has now moved online in South Australia and soon to be in Victoria as well, it is of national importance that we prepare a web based platform to ensure the safety, security and integrity of documents and communications, such as wills, powers of attorney, advanced care directives and other such solemn documents, by creating, executing and storing these documents solely in a digital format. WillBits initiative is overdue and would bring the practice of succession law into modern day Australia.”

Brooke Reardon

Principal

WillsnEstates

“I enthusiastically support and encourage the aim of WillBits to develop a web based platform to ensure the safety, security and integrity of important personal documents, such as wills, powers of attorney, advanced care directives and other such documents, by creating, executing and storing these documents solely in a digital format. I support and promote the discussion within the judicial and legislative arms of government concerning the legislative changes required for WillBits technology to be adopted in the execution and attestation of these types of documents. It is my sincere belief that, given the recent adoption of online digital technology within the court system and in the delivery of government services generally, and given the debate referred to above, the impetus to develop and employ such technology is a positive step for society. I would enthusiastically adopt such technology in my own practice and am also working on similar technology with similar goals. I believe that the profession generally would appreciate the adoption of this form of convenient tool to service its clients.”

Marcus McCarthy

Principal

Nexus Law

“I unreservedly and enthusiastically support and encourage the aim of WillBits to develop a web-based platform to ensure the safety, security and integrity of documents and communications, such as wills, powers of attorney, advanced care directives and other such solemn documents, by creating, executing and storing these documents solely in a digital format.” “I would personally enthusiastically adopt such technology in my own practice. I believe that the profession generally would also be pleased to do so, as this technology has the capacity to achieve considerable efficiencies and increased security for the benefit of both clients and lawyers.”

Jeremy Duffy

Principal

Duffy Legal

Financial exploitation is the most common way elderly Australians were being harmed. "[It's] most frequently perpetrated by the children or carers of victims.” "One of the most common instruments for committing financial abuse is the misuse or abuse of powers of attorney. A national register is definitely needed”.

Wendy Lacey

former Professor of Law,

University of South Australia

"A single register [is needed] so that anyone, whether they be financial institutions, who is dealing with an enduring power of attorney has a simple way of working out whether or not the enduring power of attorney is actually real, or represents the real document." The Honorable

Christian Porter

Federal Member for Pearce

Federal Attorney General

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